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How many current or ex-military on here

sgtken60sgtken60 Member Posts: 51 Arc User
edited February 8 in Ten Forward
Well I do this just to try to make friends and to get to know my fellow players. SO I am curious how many of on STO are current or ex-military.
Please do not give out any personal information, just branch and years/time served.

Okay I go first
8yrs in United States Navy - served in the Gator Navy , i.e. played with the USMC; as a Snipe i.e Engineering.
07
«1

Comments

  • khan5000khan5000 Member Posts: 2,609 Arc User
    11 years in the US Navy - my first ship was USS Constellation. I chose it because it had a Star Trek name. I worked in Navigation.
    Your pain runs deep.
    Let us explore it... together. Each man hides a secret pain. It must be exposed and reckoned with. It must be dragged from the darkness and forced into the light. Share your pain. Share your pain with me... and gain strength from the sharing.
  • markhawkmanmarkhawkman Member Posts: 34,090 Arc User
    heh, Army/NG. Never been on a real ship. Planes? way too many...
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    My character Tsin'xing
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  • jonsillsjonsills Member Posts: 8,574 Arc User
    USAF, 1986-1990. Spent my entire term at HQ SAC (now USSTRATCOM), in Bellevue, NE, as a SIOP Programmer/Analyst in Force Timing and Deconfliction - making sure that in the event of nuclear war, all our weapons would be delivered and our bombers could make it back out of theater. It was a joint office even then, though, because the Navy wanted someone in there due to SLCMs being part of the nuclear system. Dually assigned, as most of us were, to the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff (JSTPS), although I didn't participate much in actual planning, because I was cleared to know everything except scenarios that might lead to launch. :smile:

    I also got to make pretty slides for the senior officers, so when they briefed even more senior officers the briefings might be understood. (You'd be amazed at how hard it is to make a nuke go off before it's armed, and how easy it is afterward.)
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  • tarran61tarran61 Member Posts: 826 Arc User
    edited February 9
    We're a military family.
    Myself = US Army
    Son = US Marines
    Daughter = US Marines
    Son-in-law = US Coast Guard

    We all play the game and are in the same fleet.

    Thank you and your family/friends for their service.
    Positive thoughts.
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  • starswordcstarswordc Member Posts: 10,743 Arc User
    I didn't get to serve (I'm on the autism spectrum, which is basically an automatic disqualifier as I learned when I tried to enlist), but I'm from a Navy family going back several generations -- mom was a protocol officer, dad was an engineering duty officer, uncle was a corpsman, paternal grandfather was a sonar tech, and both paternal great-grandfathers were radiomen -- and my maternal grandfather is an Air Force vet (electronics guy).
    "Great War! / And I cannot take more! / Great tour! / I keep on marching on / I play the great score / There will be no encore / Great War! / The War to End All Wars"
    — Sabaton, "Great War"
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    Check out https://unitedfederationofpla.net/s/
  • sgtken60sgtken60 Member Posts: 51 Arc User
    edited February 10
    @starswordc, @tarran6, @patrickngo, @jonsills, @markhawkman, @khan5000
    Well thank you all for your replies - my ships BTW: USS El Paso LKA-117, and I am a plank owner of the USS Whidbey Island LSD-41.
    I was also TAD from LSD-41 to the USS Fairfax County LST-1193 for short period of time.

    And thank you all for your Service and/or your Families' Service 07
  • khan5000khan5000 Member Posts: 2,609 Arc User
    Welcome to the game, shipmate
    Your pain runs deep.
    Let us explore it... together. Each man hides a secret pain. It must be exposed and reckoned with. It must be dragged from the darkness and forced into the light. Share your pain. Share your pain with me... and gain strength from the sharing.
  • hawkeyenfo117hawkeyenfo117 Member Posts: 17 Arc User
    US Navy, early 2001 to present.
  • mustrumridcully0mustrumridcully0 Member Posts: 12,500 Arc User
    Do 10 months of mandatory military service in the German Air Force count? I was a... dunno how to translate it. Basically a grunt that would protect air force assets, manning check points, standing guard. If it had come to it, the closest to action I would have gotten would probably be helping build a sandbag dam in the Oder region (there have been a few floods there in the past).
    Star Trek Online Advancement: You start with lowbie gear, you end with Lobi gear.
  • sgtken60sgtken60 Member Posts: 51 Arc User
    @hawkeyenfo117 thank for your reply and for your service.

    @mustrumridcully0, and thank you for your reply/service and it counts as far as I am concerned (
    und ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Antwort / Dienstleistung und es zählt für mich).

    I hope I got German right?
  • sgtken60sgtken60 Member Posts: 51 Arc User
    khan5000 wrote: »
    Welcome to the game, shipmate

    Thank you shipmate 07
  • mustrumridcully0mustrumridcully0 Member Posts: 12,500 Arc User
    sgtken60 wrote: »
    @hawkeyenfo117 thank for your reply and for your service.

    @mustrumridcully0, and thank you for your reply/service and it counts as far as I am concerned (
    und ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Antwort / Dienstleistung und es zählt für mich).

    I hope I got German right?
    In this context, it might be better to translate "service" with "Dienst", though I think one wouldn't express this sentiment in that manner at all in German.
    Otherwise it sounds okay. Though you can say "Du", we're under Star Trek friends here. ;)
    Star Trek Online Advancement: You start with lowbie gear, you end with Lobi gear.
  • jeff#1284 jeff Member Posts: 24 Arc User
    United States Marine Corps, 1988-2004.
    1st batt 8th marine division.
    Combat tours, 2 Desert storm, 2 Iraqi Freedom, 4 forward ops, Afghanistan, Enduring freedom.

    M.O.S.-0369, infantry unit leader.
    Retired rank, MSGT of the corp.

    o7 to all service members active, retired, deceased or fallen in battle.

    Thank you for your service.
  • sgtken60sgtken60 Member Posts: 51 Arc User
    jeff wrote: »
    United States Marine Corps, 1988-2004.
    1st batt 8th marine division.
    Combat tours, 2 Desert storm, 2 Iraqi Freedom, 4 forward ops, Afghanistan, Enduring freedom.

    M.O.S.-0369, infantry unit leader.
    Retired rank, MSGT of the corp.

    o7 to all service members active, retired, deceased or fallen in battle.

    Thank you for your service.

    And thank you for yours Marine 07
  • brian334brian334 Member Posts: 2,186 Arc User
    US Navy 1979-1985, Electrician's Mate. I was a horrible sailor. You know that guy you knew with an attitude problem? Yeah, he was nothing compared to me. As I got older I came to regret that, but history is what it is.
  • evilmark444evilmark444 Member Posts: 4,817 Arc User
    I was a Marine Corps Reservist, but I didn't last my entire enlistment. I did great in boot camp, MCT, and MOS school but once I got to my unit and went back to my civilian job I just couldn't stay in shape. About two and a half years into my enlistment I was discharged for not meeting physical fitness standards.
    Lifetime Subscriber since Beta
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  • starswordcstarswordc Member Posts: 10,743 Arc User
    sgtken60 wrote: »
    @starswordc, @tarran6, @patrickngo, @jonsills, @markhawkman, @khan5000
    Well thank you all for your replies - my ships BTW: USS El Paso LKA-117, and I am a plank owner of the USS Whidbey Island LSD-41.
    I was also TAD from LSD-41 to the USS Fairfax County LST-1193 for short period of time.

    And thank you all for your Service and/or your Families' Service 07

    My parents met aboard USS Briscoe (DD-977), and I know Dad was involved in construction of USNS Watson (T-AKR-310) and the presale refits of USS Reid (FFG-30) before she was sold to the Turks as TCG Gelibolu (F 493).
    Do 10 months of mandatory military service in the German Air Force count? I was a... dunno how to translate it. Basically a grunt that would protect air force assets, manning check points, standing guard. If it had come to it, the closest to action I would have gotten would probably be helping build a sandbag dam in the Oder region (there have been a few floods there in the past).

    I think the equivalent in USAF is called an SF (Security Forces). Basically their version of an MP.
    "Great War! / And I cannot take more! / Great tour! / I keep on marching on / I play the great score / There will be no encore / Great War! / The War to End All Wars"
    — Sabaton, "Great War"
    VZ9ASdg.png

    Check out https://unitedfederationofpla.net/s/
  • monodosomonodoso Member Posts: 493 Arc User
    I am retired Navy. I served from 1989 until 2013. Served in the First Gulf War, Bosnian Conflict, and Global War on Terrorism. I served four ships too. The USS Nitro, USS Suribachi, USS Detroit, and USS Seattle.
    Fleet Admiral of the U.S.S. ATTILA KHAN-CDA (NX-921911).
  • jonsillsjonsills Member Posts: 8,574 Arc User
    starswordc wrote: »
    I think the equivalent in USAF is called an SF (Security Forces). Basically their version of an MP.
    Air Police (AP), actually. Most folks just call 'em MPs even though that's technically incorrect; as long as you're obeying the rules, they don't really care. (Although the 55th Special Security Squadron, the folks who guarded HQ SAC and wore those white cravats as part of the uniform, could get a little touchy about it.)
    Lorna-Wing-sig.png
  • markhawkmanmarkhawkman Member Posts: 34,090 Arc User
    I think the Navy calls theirs SP.
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    My character Tsin'xing
    Costume_marhawkman_Tsin%27xing_CC_Comic_Page_Blue_488916968.jpg
  • jonsillsjonsills Member Posts: 8,574 Arc User
    I think the Navy calls theirs SP.
    Yep, short for "Shore Patrol".
    Lorna-Wing-sig.png
  • brian334brian334 Member Posts: 2,186 Arc User
    jonsills wrote: »
    starswordc wrote: »
    I think the equivalent in USAF is called an SF (Security Forces). Basically their version of an MP.
    Air Police (AP), actually. Most folks just call 'em MPs even though that's technically incorrect; as long as you're obeying the rules, they don't really care. (Although the 55th Special Security Squadron, the folks who guarded HQ SAC and wore those white cravats as part of the uniform, could get a little touchy about it.)

    About the AP: Don't disobey the rules near or on a flight line. Ever!

    Working as a civilian construction contractor I happened to be near a flight line, in our little fenced off area, doing my thing, when a Starlifter landed. It's a beautiful old ship dating from the 1960's and it was a Reserve craft to boot. We were all brought in at the beginning of the job and introduced to the rules, the primary one being, stay in our fenced enclosure unless being escorted into or out of it by the AP guys.

    Well, one guy just had to get a closer look at the airplane, which was probably 100 yards from the construction site, and he stepped over the fence. Let's just say it was a moment that would hit 3 million views on You Tube in an hour.

    Of course, they shut down the job, and we all had to go back to security for a refresher course on staying in the enclosure, but at that point, nobody needed the lecture. I don't know how many guys it would have taken to subdue the poor idiot, but they sent three Humvees full to do the job. And they were very enthusiastic in their work.
  • jonsillsjonsills Member Posts: 8,574 Arc User
    edited February 17
    brian334 wrote: »
    jonsills wrote: »
    starswordc wrote: »
    I think the equivalent in USAF is called an SF (Security Forces). Basically their version of an MP.
    Air Police (AP), actually. Most folks just call 'em MPs even though that's technically incorrect; as long as you're obeying the rules, they don't really care. (Although the 55th Special Security Squadron, the folks who guarded HQ SAC and wore those white cravats as part of the uniform, could get a little touchy about it.)

    About the AP: Don't disobey the rules near or on a flight line. Ever!

    Working as a civilian construction contractor I happened to be near a flight line, in our little fenced off area, doing my thing, when a Starlifter landed. It's a beautiful old ship dating from the 1960's and it was a Reserve craft to boot. We were all brought in at the beginning of the job and introduced to the rules, the primary one being, stay in our fenced enclosure unless being escorted into or out of it by the AP guys.

    Well, one guy just had to get a closer look at the airplane, which was probably 100 yards from the construction site, and he stepped over the fence. Let's just say it was a moment that would hit 3 million views on You Tube in an hour.

    Of course, they shut down the job, and we all had to go back to security for a refresher course on staying in the enclosure, but at that point, nobody needed the lecture. I don't know how many guys it would have taken to subdue the poor idiot, but they sent three Humvees full to do the job. And they were very enthusiastic in their work.
    The place I worked at Offutt AFB was popularly known as the Mole Hole, four subbasements buried beneath the main HQ building. In order to get in, you needed your card to unlock the door, then your ID to get past the guard post halfway down the Hole entrance. (I worked in a place on the bottom floor, called (for no reason I could ever discern, save possibly sheer contrariness) the Air Room.) There were quite a few folks down there, ranging from junior enlisted like yours truly (a mere E-3 when I arrived) to one-star generals (higher ranks worked upstairs). Usually, enlisted are supposed to rise when officers enter, but in our office that was suspended for anyone below flag rank, else we'd never have gotten anything done.

    One fine morning, a major apparently decided that forgetting his ID at home wasn't that big a deal - he'd just order those mere sergeants at the guard post to let him by; surely they'd be intimidated by his exalted rank. When I passed, one of them had him against the wall at pistol-point while his partner covered them both with an M-4, waiting for backup to arrive. I don't recall ever seeing that particular major anywhere in the Hole ever again.
    Lorna-Wing-sig.png
  • markhawkmanmarkhawkman Member Posts: 34,090 Arc User
    edited February 17
    jonsills wrote: »
    The place I worked at Offutt AFB was popularly known as the Mole Hole, four subbasements buried beneath the main HQ building. In order to get in, you needed your card to unlock the door, then your ID to get past the guard post halfway down the Hole entrance. (I worked in a place on the bottom floor, called (for no reason I could ever discern, save possibly sheer contrariness) the Air Room.) There were quite a few folks down there, ranging from junior enlisted like yours truly (a mere E-3 when I arrived) to one-star generals (higher ranks worked upstairs). Usually, enlisted are supposed to rise when officers enter, but in our office that was suspended for anyone below flag rank, else we'd never have gotten anything done.

    One fine morning, a major apparently decided that forgetting his ID at home wasn't that big a deal - he'd just order those mere sergeants at the guard post to let him by; surely they'd be intimidated by his exalted rank. When I passed, one of them had him against the wall at pistol-point while his partner covered them both with an M-4, waiting for backup to arrive. I don't recall ever seeing that particular major anywhere in the Hole ever again.
    Several places I worked if you were on security duty and some officer tried to tell you to let him through without showing proper ID, the proper response was to tell him to take it up with the facility commander(either a Colonel or General)… by phone... from somewhere else. Most officers didn't bother asking a second time and just showed their ID at the security check point.
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    My character Tsin'xing
    Costume_marhawkman_Tsin%27xing_CC_Comic_Page_Blue_488916968.jpg
  • hawkeyenfo117hawkeyenfo117 Member Posts: 17 Arc User
    edited February 17
    jonsills wrote: »
    I think the Navy calls theirs SP.
    Yep, short for "Shore Patrol".
    Actually the specific term for the Navy enlisted rating for the security/law enforcement specialization is "Master-at-Arms" (MA). The term "Naval Security Forces" refers more broadly to the group of personnel including MAs, security officers, DoD police, contract security, and other personnel with the required training, who provide security/force protection to naval installations and vessels.

    The term "Shore Patrol" usually refers more to personnel assigned to make sure fellow unit members are behaving themselves while on a port call or liberty. When I did shore patrol, it was something where they picked a bunch of people from the unit and assigned shifts they were supposed to cover by roving about in town where most of the people from the ship/squadron would congregate. If you saw US military people doing stupid stuff (or on the verge of doing so), you were to intervene and try to keep things from getting out of hand, or bring people back to the ship/base if necessary. In my experience it was mostly a watch that was only stood up when we had a port call on deployment or when most of the unit was operating in a temporary location (like Key West for example) where a lot of people would be out in town after duty hours.
  • ryan218ryan218 Member Posts: 34,404 Arc User
    jonsills wrote: »
    I think the Navy calls theirs SP.
    Yep, short for "Shore Patrol".
    Actually the specific term for the Navy enlisted rating for the security/law enforcement specialization is "Master-at-Arms" (MA). The term "Naval Security Forces" refers more broadly to the group of personnel including MAs, security officers, DoD police, contract security, and other personnel with the required training, who provide security/force protection to naval installations and vessels.

    The term "Shore Patrol" usually refers more to personnel assigned to make sure fellow unit members are behaving themselves while on a port call or liberty. When I did shore patrol, it was something where they picked a bunch of people from the unit and assigned shifts they were supposed to cover by roving about in town where most of the people from the ship/squadron would congregate. If you saw US military people doing stupid stuff (or on the verge of doing so), you were to intervene and try to keep things from getting out of hand, or bring people back to the ship/base if necessary. In my experience it was mostly a watch that was only stood up when we had a port call on deployment or when most of the unit was operating in a temporary location (like Key West for example) where a lot of people would be out in town after duty hours.

    Yeah, my Grandad was a Petty Officer (ASW Specialist) in the RN during the '60s, and he was frequently assigned to the shore party when the frigate he served on (a Second World War Loch-Class) made port. He told me this story about how he had to drag back this sailor who was completely off his noggin' on alcohol, and was stupid enough to take a swing at my Grandad. You can probably guess how well that went.
  • messicrafter#6700 messicrafter Member Posts: 49 Arc User
    edited February 18
    I'm not currently in the military, I'm in the Civil Air Patrol. But I have family currently serving in Marines, Army, and the Air Force. And also several retired Army and Navy members in my family.​​
    Post edited by messicrafter#6700 on
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  • mustrumridcully0mustrumridcully0 Member Posts: 12,500 Arc User
    starswordc wrote: »
    I think the equivalent in USAF is called an SF (Security Forces). Basically their version of an MP.
    Security Forces might be it. But MP? Isn't that military police? Because that is not it, that's the "Feldjäger" (literally Field Hunter). (Or maybe also not quite, because according to Wikipedia, they have less legal powers than military police in other nations. But it's the closest to it.)
    Star Trek Online Advancement: You start with lowbie gear, you end with Lobi gear.
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