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Why play anymore?

new dungeon is impossible to get past arcturia
old dungeons still unplayable and now demo is back to being broken again
I have all my gear....no point in doing expeditions anymore
I have all my boons....no point in doing campaigns
I have more RAD then i could refine in a year, no point in farming that....
So now I can't even play this game.....thanks cryptic
Parwen Valerian DC
Rekk Talent OP

Comments

  • kemnimtarkaskemnimtarkas Posts: 678Member Arc User
    Honestly the game isn't fun for me right now. Grinding MEs to get level 80 gear is just boring.

    I used to be one who'd look to spend when the sales came along, like the one on the coal ward key pack right now.

    But at the moment I have zero interest in buying any Zen, or doing much of anything else in game other than desultory VIP key daily. I don't even bother to invoke my alts.

    Having much more fun exploring different quest lines in ESO.
  • gigalens#6466 gigalens Posts: 112Member Arc User
  • gigalens#6466 gigalens Posts: 112Member Arc User
    edited May 26
    https://arcgames.com/en/forums/neverwinter#/discussion/1248386

    Here is some helpful advise for Cryptic. I am an expert in the field of sales and marketing with 25+ years under my belt. I'm watching Cryptic lose a majority of it's market through offering very broken product (mod 16) to it's current customer base. I see a few "loyal" folks saying that those who are unhappy should be ignored because they are going to be unhappy no matter what, and those that are happy don't yell as loud.

    That is the most ridiculous bunch of forum gerrymandering I think I have ever heard.

    The company that doesn't listen to the complaints of it's customer base is doomed to fail; especially since normally only a small percentage of dissatisfied customers ever actually complain - many dissatisfied customers will just leave, taking their money and loyalty to a competitor. Here are some amazing statistics that are tried and true when it comes to sales, customer service, and retaining a profitable customer base. Just read these stats below:

    (from "15 Statistics That Should Change The Business World – But Haven't") This article was posted by Colin Shaw, a customer experience expert who is considered one of the UK's leading Management Consultants in 2019.

    * A customer is 4 times more likely to defect to a competitor if the problem is service-related than price- or product-related – Bain & Company.

    * For every customer complaint there are 26 other unhappy customers who have remained silent –Lee Resource.

    * 96% of unhappy customers don’t complain, however 91% of those will simply leave and never come back – 1Financial Training services.

    * A dissatisfied customer will tell between 9-15 people about their experience. Around 13% of dissatisfied customers tell more than 20 people. – White House Office of Consumer Affairs.

    * Happy customers who get their issue resolved tell about 4-6 people about their experience. – White House Office of Consumer Affair.

    * 70% of buying experiences are based on how the customer feels they are being treated – McKinsey.

    * It takes 12 positive experiences to make up for one unresolved negative experience – “Understanding Customers” by Ruby Newell-Legner.

    * It costs 6–7 times more to acquire a new customer than retain an existing one – Bain & Company.

    Here's some great examples of major products (and companies) who didn't listen to their customers and became noticeably less successful or failed altogether, from askwonder.com

    1. Netflix:
    In 2011, Netflix ignored what their customers were asking for and split its DVD and streaming businesses, effectively increasing the price of both by 40%. The result was that 800 000 subscribers cancelled their service and in a survey Netflix was rated as one of the 10 most hated companies in the US.

    2. Kodak:
    In 1992, Kodak Eastman's revenue was $20 billion, but as digital cameras gained popularity, they refused to respond and tried to protect their film and film processing business. As companies such as Sony and Fuji started selling more digital cameras, Kodak resisted the consumer demand for digital cameras and by 2010 they were only in sixth place in the digital camera market, In 2011, Kodak Eastman filed for bankruptcy, with their share price at 65c, dropping from $94 in 1997.

    3. Firestone:
    After Firestone started producing radial tyres in 1972, internal company documents found that the rubber came off the wire when the tire was in use. But when customers complained about it, Firestone blamed tire failure on substandard maintenance by the consumer in order to satisfy the high demand for radial tyres from General Motors, etc. Only after an investigation by the National Highway and Traffic Administration in 1980 found that Firestone was actually aware of the defective products, did they publicly admit the error. Their shares dropped to $6.25 in 1980 from a $33.25 high in 1969. In 1988 Firestone was bought out by Bridgestone.

    4. Goldman Sachs:
    Goldman Sachs have made headlines repeatedly over the past few years for exploiting the worldwide financial crisis. When the executive director in the firm’s London office resigned and published a opinion saying “The interests of the client continue to be sidelined in the way the firm operates and thinks about making money,” and quoting directors calling customers "Muppets," the company's revenue dropped in 2012 to its lowest level since 2005 and was forced to cut salaries by 14% and reduce its headcount.

    5. Lululemon:
    Between 2009 2012, Lululemon's stock increased in value over 1800% and the company was incredibly successful. But is 2013 customers began complaining about the sheerness of their yoga pants after switching to new suppliers. The company's response via its founder, Chip Wilson was to blame overweight women, saying: "They don’t work for some women’s bodies, it’s really about the rubbing through the thighs, how much pressure is there over a period of time, how much they use it.” This led to a drop in sales costing Lululemon $67 million and both Wilson and the CEO stepping down. With the entrance into the yoga pants market of Gap and Under Armour, Lululemon could never really recover from this and their share price dropped over 30% in 2013.

    8. Coca Cola
    In response to Pepsi's sweeter taste and increased market share, Coca Cola discontinued its original formula and launched "New Coke." But Coca Cola ignored the emotional connection to its brand and the fact that taste is actually not the deciding factor in purchasing a soft drink. Customers revolted against New Coke and refused to buy it, resulting in a return of the original formula to shelves later in the year

    9. Target:
    Target entered the Canadian market in 2013 and did not consider their Canadian customer base. They increased prices in Canada compared to the US, not realising that 70% of regular Target shoppers in Canada have also shopped in the company’s US stores. These customers not only have a perception of what Target is all about, they also complained that the shopping experience in Target Canada was not as great as their experience in the US. Brian Cornell, Target's CEO admitted in 2015 that " We delivered an experience that didn't meet our guests’ expectations," and closed its Canadian stores, resulting in $2.5 billion in losses for the company.

    10. Blockbusters:
    At its peak in 2009, Blockbuster had 5,000 stores worldwide. But by 2010 Blockbuster filed for bankruptcy and its assets were sold to Dish Network. When companies like Netflix and Redbox came along, they dismissed them as no threat and claimed that they were "too big too fail" As customers started leaving their stores, in stead of responding to that, they tried to increase the average customer basket size with sweets and trinkets, almost converting into a convenience store. Blockbusters had sufficient information to know that their customer behaviour was changing and they did not adapt to it, leading to their bankruptcy.

    I realize that many companies want to think they have it all in hand, and they are giving the customer what they want. Unfortunately, many companies begin making decisions about what the board or designers internally want to give to the customer, rather than giving their client base what they are requesting.

    This situation is obviously NOT a case of a few people complaining about a minor issue, otherwise there would not have been a formal apology letter written by the project lead, Thomas Foss. This situation is about a huge number of players making their voices known about the inability to continue using the product they love in the way that they were accustomed to. Imagine the company Nestle abandoning all of their cookies and sweets that they are known for, and starting to focus on only making pizza. Everyone would be up in arms about all the Nestle cookies and chocolate no longer being available. Then if Nestle CEO, Ulf Mark Schneider, wrote an apology letter to everyone saying We are sorry you no longer have the cookies and chocolate available, but we now have lots of great pizza! How ridiculous would that be?!

    The most obvious thing to any outsider looking in at Cryptic is that they are making this very mistake. Minor changes were needed for Mod 16, but they overhauled the whole system. Scaling has removed any motivation to progress in the game. Rewards are gone. The player economy is almost gone. A reduction in unique character classes and powers make players feel weak instead of strong. And truly, the main thing that is sinking this game faster than the titanic is the broken, broken content.

    I have written a lot lately on the forums. I have spouted anger, frustration, and in some moments sadness. Now I am trying to appeal to Cryptic's sense of business and customer service.

    Please, Wizards of the Coast, Cryptic, Thomas Foss and all the developers, please make a u-turn. Take a step back to Mod 15. Incorporate your new content into the old system, which was still rewarding players for playing. It will take you less time to adjust one campaign (undermountain) than it will to fix 17 others and all the quests for the leveling areas.

    If you continue just patching, you'll lose your shirt along with most of your customer base.

    Thanks for listening.

    Post edited by gigalens#6466 on
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