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Unofficial Literary Challenge 47 Discussion Thread

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  • julian#8673 julian Member Posts: 1 Arc User
    I've never posted any comment before so this might be an awkward start, but I just have to say that I really appreciate the "Masterverse" series. It's very well written, with intricate but compelling storylines and natural sounding dialogue (which is quite refreshing for anything that has the words "Star Trek" on it"). The characters are quite engaging and lively, even though they sometimes have a strong "sugar coating" applied to them.
    The best bit is the Machiavellian politcs, of course, and the realistic (relatively) social dynamics.
    But I have to say, I really, really despise the "Moab Confederacy" (from an in - universe point of view, of course).
    Their "values" are far too reminiscent of what many real life "social engineers" fantasize about. There is a certain rightist snobbishness going on in my country that is right up the same alley. You know, a sort of "let the refugees drown, the poor deserve to starve, only the educated deserve to vote" kind of thing. Even from otherwise kind and compassionate people.
    It seems you're propping up the Moabites (who have abandoned a free and fair existence in an advanced society with the express purpose of recreating the misery and exploitation of "ancient" capitalist societies) and framing them as the heroes, whilst also casting the Federation as the corrupt antagonists.
    I don't have any issue with this, mind you. I find it excellent . Fiction is certainly the place for this kind of thing. But, honestly, it kind of/sort of bugs me that no one points out (in the story) that their complaints against the Federation are utter hogwash. I mean, imagine if a group of "libertarians" from the US decided to establish a "free" colony in the Middle East, in the desert, right next to ISIS. Clearly, the fate of these colonists would go south very quickly. But the question that would naturally arise is whether the US should feel compelled to waste tax payer dollars and sacrifice the lives of its troops to shield these people from the consequences of their own stupidity. I personally would say "leave them to their fate".
    Correspondingly, the Moabites clearly deserve their fate and the Federation is under no obligation to arm them. In fact, it could be argued that the Federation is obliged to keep them disarmed, so as to protect potentially vulnerable civilizations from this obviously selfish and irresponsible group.
    This is the only little thing that keeps nagging somewhere at the back of my mind. I just want someone to tell these people off.

    I apologize if the scribbling above come across as rude/silly or misplaced. If that be the case, I shall obligingly delete this post.
  • starswordcstarswordc Member Posts: 10,372 Community Moderator
    edited July 1
    I've never posted any comment before so this might be an awkward start, but I just have to say that I really appreciate the "Masterverse" series. It's very well written, with intricate but compelling storylines and natural sounding dialogue (which is quite refreshing for anything that has the words "Star Trek" on it"). The characters are quite engaging and lively, even though they sometimes have a strong "sugar coating" applied to them.
    The best bit is the Machiavellian politcs, of course, and the realistic (relatively) social dynamics.
    But I have to say, I really, really despise the "Moab Confederacy" (from an in - universe point of view, of course).
    Their "values" are far too reminiscent of what many real life "social engineers" fantasize about. There is a certain rightist snobbishness going on in my country that is right up the same alley. You know, a sort of "let the refugees drown, the poor deserve to starve, only the educated deserve to vote" kind of thing. Even from otherwise kind and compassionate people.
    It seems you're propping up the Moabites (who have abandoned a free and fair existence in an advanced society with the express purpose of recreating the misery and exploitation of "ancient" capitalist societies) and framing them as the heroes, whilst also casting the Federation as the corrupt antagonists.
    I don't have any issue with this, mind you. I find it excellent . Fiction is certainly the place for this kind of thing. But, honestly, it kind of/sort of bugs me that no one points out (in the story) that their complaints against the Federation are utter hogwash. I mean, imagine if a group of "libertarians" from the US decided to establish a "free" colony in the Middle East, in the desert, right next to ISIS. Clearly, the fate of these colonists would go south very quickly. But the question that would naturally arise is whether the US should feel compelled to waste tax payer dollars and sacrifice the lives of its troops to shield these people from the consequences of their own stupidity. I personally would say "leave them to their fate".
    Correspondingly, the Moabites clearly deserve their fate and the Federation is under no obligation to arm them. In fact, it could be argued that the Federation is obliged to keep them disarmed, so as to protect potentially vulnerable civilizations from this obviously selfish and irresponsible group.
    This is the only little thing that keeps nagging somewhere at the back of my mind. I just want someone to tell these people off.

    I apologize if the scribbling above come across as rude/silly or misplaced. If that be the case, I shall obligingly delete this post.

    First off I'll say this: the real-life political opinions of authors tend to leak into things they write, whether they mean them to or not. I have the impression from being a peripheral writer and worldbuilding contributor of the Masterverse for several years that the writing circle was a little bit top-heavy with conservatives in its heyday. Right-libertarians, granted (and to be clear, that's small-'l' libertarian as in devoted to protecting civil liberties, not necessarily economic libertarians), but some of the stuff that, for example @sander233 wrote (sadly he is no longer with us) wouldn't be out of place in Tom Clancy. And I admire Tom Clancy as probably the foremost writer of military fiction in the 20th century, but I have a lot of disagreements with his politics (especially as expressed in some of the later Jack Ryanverse novels like The Teeth of the Tiger). I'm a libertarian, too, but I'm a left-libertarian. And some of my focus in the new stories and rewrites has been to try and cast the Federation-Moab conflict a little more neutrally (without violating existing canon too much).

    So, there are things I like about Moab. There are also a lot of very significant things I don't like about Moab. Moab is intended to do some very morally ambiguous or outright wrong things, even by its originator @patrickngo. Thing you have to consider, though, is where they came from in-universe. Here's the thing about the "needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few": what's viewed as good for the many isn't necessarily popular with the few. Rather like Diane Duane's version of the Romulans (see the novel series Rihannsu, which is highly recommended reading material anyway), Moab's ancestors were composed of several groups of people who didn't like the direction Earth was headed during the formation of United Earth and decided to get out while the getting was good. These most prominently included Israeli Jews displaced by the fall of Israel during WW3, a lot of Southeast Asian anti-communists (Vietnamese especially), and various economic and political nationalists including from the United States, all of whom had a bone to pick with the idea of United Earth for a wide variety of reasons (state secularism and hostility to religion, disgruntlement at other members, opposition to the idea of a world government supreme over nation-states). They were headed for Alpha Centauri, and if they'd gotten there that probably would've been the end of it for all intents and purposes, but they didn't: instead they fell through a wormhole that landed them in a borderline uninhabitable system on what was then the Klingon-Romulan border, and, oh, 150 years earlier than they left.

    So their culture grew up on this death world (think Grayson in Honor Harrington) and their nationalism took a collectivist bent, but for a very different reason and with very different effects than Federation-style collectivism. Restricting welfare and the right to vote, brutality towards lawbreakers and a willingness to go outside the law to accomplish? It's bred by the harsh environment that required everyone to pull together, except given the baseline right-wing bent of the settlers, instead of benefiting by contributing to the colony, you're penalized if you don't (negative reinforcement versus positive reinforcement). And this culture evolved separately from United Earth and later the Federation for a good 300 years, so they were for all intents and purposes an independent nation to begin with.

    And then they were recontacted by the Federation, and essentially annexed back into United Earth in exchange for medical and scientific advancements: Moab is, as previously mentioned, a poor world for most Earth-origin life and the average life expectancy had dropped to 40-ish. And United Earth, having been a founding and very influential member of the Federation for ~150 years, was now insisting that all the world had to conform to its norms (ref. Kirk and Picard's tendency to lecture people on how they're supposed to be, especially early-season Picard). That's gonna rankle.

    As far as weapons, consider this: politics firmly aside, you don't necessarily need a gun for self-defense in a big city (I say again, gun politics aside, I'm talking about practical facts): the police are at most a few minutes away. Your house catches fire? Same thing. You've got a garbage truck that comes by to deal with your house's leavings. You've got buses and maybe a subway system to get around so you might be able to get by without a car. The government services are present and they work pretty well for the most part (again, speaking in generalities: I'm fully aware there's some pretty awful exceptions). But I live out in backwoods North Carolina. The nearest town to me is four miles away and has around 4,000 people. Emergency response time is in tens of minutes or more, the fire department is composed of volunteers (i.e. you'll probably lose the house), and you take your trash to the landfill/recycling center in the back of your pickup truck, which you need because there's no public transportation. And on the off chance your house is broken into, or if your neighbor down the road loses his marbles over his significant other leaving him, you might actually legitimately need a firearm to defend your family. And that's the problem Moab and other fringe planets are faced with: because space is big and warp drive is a fairly slow FTL method compared to other works in the genre (or compared to things like quantum slipstream drive), it takes hours or days for Starfleet to respond to an incident -- whether that's Orion pirates, Klingons going a-wiking, or a negative space wedgie -- so having local armed forces of their own to call on is a survival trait. Whereas in Federation core worlds it usually isn't because Starfleet is right there (and most nasties aside from the negative space wedgie or the Borg aren't going to travel that deep into Federation space anyway). Problem is, during the Maquis revolt in the 2370s, the Federation (led by United Earth) outlawed arming colony worlds for fear of more such revolts.

    Before I go any further, why all the focus in this explanation on United Earth? Out-of-universe, it's mostly an extrapolation of why most speaking roles are given to Earth-origin humans, as opposed to humans from colonies or aliens. It also doesn't hurt that people like Picard strike a blue-collar guy like me as fairly bourgeois, with coming from a prominent winemaking family, quoting the Bard in casual conversation, and being dismissive of musical forms newer than World War II as in "Suddenly Human" (which out-of-universe probably has a lot more to do with the show not having to pay royalties, like they would if they decided Janeway was a Doro Pesch fan). And DS9 excepted, the focus is all on the experience of the officers, the educated, the commanders, and not on the blue-collar grunts, squints, and snipes who actually keep the ship running.

    And that's why I designed the background I did for Kanril Eleya, i.e. kind of the anti-Picard. Small town working class background (they never had any trouble putting food on the table but they were hardly aristocratic), religious, prefers pulpier literature and more popular music, and quicker to violence and a lot more prone to thinking with her heart. I find the Bajorans useful as a point of comparison for Moab because I interpret them very much like red-to-purple state Americans: they've got that independent streak, they're suspicious of secularism, and they're deeply protective of the right to bear arms. But there's points of difference: one, they're a lot more okay with the idea of a welfare state and they're more internally unified, in part due to mostly all following the same religion instead of many different ones (compare to European Catholic nationalists, as opposed to American Protestant nationalists). Something I haven't said outright but I have in my head is that the Temple of the Prophets actually helps administer Bajor's welfare system (rather like the state government of Utah recently partnered with the LDS Church to tackle homelessness by constructing small dwellings for the homeless): one piece of evidence is that the major hospital in the city of Hathon is run by a Jesuit-like religious sect called the Brotherhood of Kern. Their militarization and support of the right to bear arms is born from defense of country (think of the Occupation, which deliberately paralleled the N*zi occupation of Europe), not necessarily defense of self. And, as mentioned briefly in The Burning of Berun's World things like restricting the franchise* are not well-thought-of.

    To be clear: that there's a well-thought-out reason for taking an action, doesn't necessarily make that action correct.

    * And in fact that's something that gets specifically targeted for deconstruction by @patrickngo himself: because the franchise in Moab is restricted to people who make enough to pay taxes on their income, a sufficiently well-funded organization can tip elections by setting up a shell company and hiring people likely to vote for their preferred candidate, which is demonstrated in the early part of the Moab Civil War arc (most recently discussed in Create Your Own Fate).
    "Two ways to view the world, so similar at times / Two ways to rule the world, to justify their crimes / By Kings and Queens young men are sent to die in war / Their propaganda speaks those words been heard before"
    — Sabaton, "A Lifetime of War"
    9MUythl.png
    (Still in development)
    Volunteer community moderator for Star Trek Online forums. I am not a Cryptic or Perfect World employee, and comments made without [Mod Hat/] notation are my own opinions and do not reflect company policy. If you do see me put on my [Mod Hat/], please pay attention because I am speaking as a moderator.
  • patrickngopatrickngo Member Posts: 9,009 Arc User
    I've never posted any comment before so this might be an awkward start, but I just have to say that I really appreciate the "Masterverse" series. It's very well written, with intricate but compelling storylines and natural sounding dialogue (which is quite refreshing for anything that has the words "Star Trek" on it"). The characters are quite engaging and lively, even though they sometimes have a strong "sugar coating" applied to them.
    The best bit is the Machiavellian politcs, of course, and the realistic (relatively) social dynamics.
    But I have to say, I really, really despise the "Moab Confederacy" (from an in - universe point of view, of course).
    Their "values" are far too reminiscent of what many real life "social engineers" fantasize about. There is a certain rightist snobbishness going on in my country that is right up the same alley. You know, a sort of "let the refugees drown, the poor deserve to starve, only the educated deserve to vote" kind of thing. Even from otherwise kind and compassionate people.
    It seems you're propping up the Moabites (who have abandoned a free and fair existence in an advanced society with the express purpose of recreating the misery and exploitation of "ancient" capitalist societies) and framing them as the heroes, whilst also casting the Federation as the corrupt antagonists.
    I don't have any issue with this, mind you. I find it excellent . Fiction is certainly the place for this kind of thing. But, honestly, it kind of/sort of bugs me that no one points out (in the story) that their complaints against the Federation are utter hogwash. I mean, imagine if a group of "libertarians" from the US decided to establish a "free" colony in the Middle East, in the desert, right next to ISIS. Clearly, the fate of these colonists would go south very quickly. But the question that would naturally arise is whether the US should feel compelled to waste tax payer dollars and sacrifice the lives of its troops to shield these people from the consequences of their own stupidity. I personally would say "leave them to their fate".
    Correspondingly, the Moabites clearly deserve their fate and the Federation is under no obligation to arm them. In fact, it could be argued that the Federation is obliged to keep them disarmed, so as to protect potentially vulnerable civilizations from this obviously selfish and irresponsible group.
    This is the only little thing that keeps nagging somewhere at the back of my mind. I just want someone to tell these people off.

    I apologize if the scribbling above come across as rude/silly or misplaced. If that be the case, I shall obligingly delete this post.

    funy thing, the Moabite answer to your question about a hypothetical colonizing of the Middle East? would also be "Leave us alone we'll handle it."

    Starswordc's covered most of the core points, but there are a few others I also started off working with;

    In Trek, there is a tendency to treat "race" (species) as THE determiner in politics. It's an artifact of the "Planet of Hats" stereotyping, with characters like Worf being "Specially enlightened" for going against it-defining them as 'heroes'.

    Thing is, Race does NOT determine political alignment. Even in the real world, it doesn't, though there are lots of people who would love to force that into being for various causes in the real world.

    Mostly from having nothing better to offer a potential constituency but validation of their fears and resentments.

    also in Star Trek, we've seen a LOT of corruption happening from time to time, from the sheer number of 'bad admirals' that have featured as villains in both the shows and movies, to internal conspiracies and attempted coups (Admiral Leyton, Admiral Marcus, etc.)

    So the Federation/United Earth is far from being an avatar of political sobriety or free of corruption...and how could it be? it's composed of people, and people are not ants, or stereotypes. The best anyone can say, is that they're trying to be better. but that comes with a cost, and with errors.

    sometimes, those errors have consequences, but a polity the sheer size and scope of the United Federation of Planets can absorb those consequences for a long, long time before anyone in a position to make or change decisions notices them.

    Hence, a policy that seemed to be perfectly reasonable in 2371, sets up a resentment leading to secession in the next century at a moment of weakness for the Federation. The reasons seem petty to you, but that's because...well, to you, they aren't important. To the people we're talking about, they're matters of life, death, and liberty, or matters of what they percieve to be sentient's rights and more important, methods of protecting said rights.

    Now, I did, intentionally, build in flaws to the Confederates. They aren't supposed to be perfect little An-Caps with a happy little utopia. There's a whole lot that is outright wrong with them as a culture, but that's as much as anything else, to point out what's right. yeah, you have to be a taxpayer to vote-it's not a new or novel concept, the idea being that only those who contribute to society should have a say in how the laws are made. By the same token, a 13 year old who paid taxes this year (say, 2408) can cast a vote in the next election, while a forty year old on public assistance can't.

    It's a different arbitrary standard than basing the franchise on age, or gender, but it's (from the writing side) an intentionally arbitrary system. It's backed by a sort of logic-Colonies have it tough, those who don't contribute really shouldn't have a say unless or until they do, because it's a survival issue. I outright exploited flaws in that system to create a conflict internally, and did so with the obvious cheat to the system.

    That flaw was intentional. It's supposed to be a dysfunction. Likewise for early, pre-recontact statutes that wind up with a 'pass the tests get in' military recruitment policy. Moab has a 'year' roughly equivalent to the orbital period of Mars-a bit under 800 local days, and a rotational period of 30 hours. when they colonized the place, they were cut off for over a century (earth time) objective, and subjective (thanks to the colony group passing through a non-charted wormhole) 300 years subjective.

    Nobody even knew to look for them until an early Federation survey vessel found them. They had to re-adjust to getting 24 hour days imposed on their timekeeping and counting years in Earth years, (aka 'standard years').

    so a law written back when they were in isolation winds up opening recruitment to younger teenagers instead of full adults.

    Oops.

    but theirs werent' the only mistakes made. Earth/The Federation sees them as "humans" and applies "human" standards as defined by United Earth to a culture that's had 300 years in a radically different environment to develop, with short generations thanks to high mortality rates and a largely incompatible biosphere that has to be handled carefully because most earthlife crops didn't survive.

    The longer your local lifespan, the longer it takes for things like language to change. at their 'first contact' the local lingo was almost unintelligible to language scholars from Earth. It took 2 years before anyone could talk to each other. Had they NOT looked human at the time, they probably would've been left alone, or brought in as a member world outright, instead of being treated as a colony.

    but...they're "Human" and "Race determines Political Alignment", so they were lumped under a United Earth that did not share their values and did not understand their environment, and as Starswordc points out, the "Picard mentality" is something fairly dominant even in the old series trek.

    IOW Starfleet and Federation officials didn't see the need to understand them in order to govern them.

    Hence, a local feeling that the Federation was 'holding them back' and 'holding them down' over the course of the decades after re-contact.

    It's nto that it was intentional, it's that the assumptions were completely different. Moab had already established their secondary colony on New Saigon (an earthlike moon that is, objectively, probably the better location to actually live-at least before it was destroyed) and they hadn't forgotten how Warp drives work during the isolation period-they just didn't have the resources to fix the colony ships until sometime after contact was re-established.

    (materials for a warp drive are advanced materials, energy-intensive and not able to be dug out of the rocks and boiled to create, even with the rather nasty and prevalent exotics in Moab's crust.)

    The underlying conflict is one of assumptions. The Federation had a hell of a time putting governors in for the first fifty years, until they appointed a Vulcan to handle the "Colonial Administration".

    Notably, that vulcan was probably the most popular "Federation governor" they ever had-because he wasn't coming from a United Earth background and didn't remind them of the reasons they left Earth in the first place.

    but being governed from afar, after 300 years of (even unsuccessful) independence tends to rankle people. Just look at some of the movements in N. America in the 1990s or the Brexit movement for examples, or Poland/Hungary/Italy's recent conflicts with the EU Parliament. The actual policies that have people in the real world angry are different, but the basic conflict of assumptions is the same.

    Local rule vs. Distant Rule, it's a thing, esp. with humans.










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    Well, TRIBBLE them, I'll play KDF anyway.

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    Advocacy
    simple logic process:

    The body is filled with so much blood...It's always more than you think!! -Dr. Dinosaur

  • knightraider6knightraider6 Member Posts: 365 Arc User
    Just posted my take on the first prompt-though it's more in setting up a Dominion goodwill tour. of course, in light of certain developments in game...it may definitely be an intresting voyage.
    "It may be better to be a live jackal than a dead lion, but it is better still to be a live lion. And usually easier." R.A.Heinlein

    "he's as dangerous as a ferret with a chainsaw."



  • antonine3258antonine3258 Member Posts: 2,376 Arc User
    starswordc wrote: »
    Well actually, as far as Zapp Kagran was concerned, in this 'verse he pitched his idea of the frontal assault on the Herald Sphere... and was immediately relieved of command by Ja'rod and Chancellor Worf.* :tongue: (Eleya then redesigned the plan into one where the frontal assault was a diversion for a cloakship delivering a Romulan sunkiller bomb into the sphere's star.) So the part about Eleya understanding most Klingons not to be dumb ragers is still true. On the other hand, Prime!Kanril also didn't spend her entire career up to her story debut on the Klingon front: instead she was stationed on the Romulan border for a couple years, then spent a bit of time as a liaison officer on DS9.

    Just to confirm 'this 'verse' is referring to the Masterverse version (or at least the offshoot version)? Just on the phrasing. Not trying to be offensive to a big labor of love with the Masterverse (it's not my cuppa) but it's portrayals of the Federation as an entity are almost always as a cause of problems.

    Actually I generally can tell the difference between the two Eleyas - Prime always feels more reflective of herself as a 'hammer' solution to problems (not that they aren't creative solutions necessary, but her lack of diplomacy has had consequences)

    It's a very solid first part.

    Fate - protects fools, small children, and ships named Enterprise Will Riker

    Member Access Denied Armada!

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  • starswordcstarswordc Member Posts: 10,372 Community Moderator
    edited July 12
    starswordc wrote: »
    Well actually, as far as Zapp Kagran was concerned, in this 'verse he pitched his idea of the frontal assault on the Herald Sphere... and was immediately relieved of command by Ja'rod and Chancellor Worf.* :tongue: (Eleya then redesigned the plan into one where the frontal assault was a diversion for a cloakship delivering a Romulan sunkiller bomb into the sphere's star.) So the part about Eleya understanding most Klingons not to be dumb ragers is still true. On the other hand, Prime!Kanril also didn't spend her entire career up to her story debut on the Klingon front: instead she was stationed on the Romulan border for a couple years, then spent a bit of time as a liaison officer on DS9.

    Just to confirm 'this 'verse' is referring to the Masterverse version (or at least the offshoot version)? Just on the phrasing. Not trying to be offensive to a big labor of love with the Masterverse (it's not my cuppa) but it's portrayals of the Federation as an entity are almost always as a cause of problems.
    No, I was referring to Prime!Eleya's continuity. (I have a draft of a story depicting all that, but it's one of the several partially-written stories that have been sitting on my Google Drive for multiple years.) We haven't decided in detail how the arcs after the Borg/Undine one went in the Masterverse, a lot of stuff got derailed when Sander233 got sick a few years ago.
    Actually I generally can tell the difference between the two Eleyas - Prime always feels more reflective of herself as a 'hammer' solution to problems (not that they aren't creative solutions necessary, but her lack of diplomacy has had consequences)

    It's a very solid first part.

    Yeah, she is very direct in her problem solving. And there's definitely a darkness to both versions, something I'm exploring in more detail in the next segment of For We Should Grow Too Fond of It (which I'm hoping I can get out sometime in the next month).

    Part two of this story is in progress still. It's a little weird for me to be writing Eleya with the talky political plot and give the "action quotient" to somebody else entirely.
    "Two ways to view the world, so similar at times / Two ways to rule the world, to justify their crimes / By Kings and Queens young men are sent to die in war / Their propaganda speaks those words been heard before"
    — Sabaton, "A Lifetime of War"
    9MUythl.png
    (Still in development)
    Volunteer community moderator for Star Trek Online forums. I am not a Cryptic or Perfect World employee, and comments made without [Mod Hat/] notation are my own opinions and do not reflect company policy. If you do see me put on my [Mod Hat/], please pay attention because I am speaking as a moderator.
  • antonine3258antonine3258 Member Posts: 2,376 Arc User
    I know it's been quite a while, but here's one for Prompt 2 Enjoy the Beauty of Godless Spaces
    Fate - protects fools, small children, and ships named Enterprise Will Riker

    Member Access Denied Armada!

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  • starswordcstarswordc Member Posts: 10,372 Community Moderator
    I know it's been quite a while, but here's one for Prompt 2 Enjoy the Beauty of Godless Spaces

    That was extremely good. I especially liked the POV work.
    "Two ways to view the world, so similar at times / Two ways to rule the world, to justify their crimes / By Kings and Queens young men are sent to die in war / Their propaganda speaks those words been heard before"
    — Sabaton, "A Lifetime of War"
    9MUythl.png
    (Still in development)
    Volunteer community moderator for Star Trek Online forums. I am not a Cryptic or Perfect World employee, and comments made without [Mod Hat/] notation are my own opinions and do not reflect company policy. If you do see me put on my [Mod Hat/], please pay attention because I am speaking as a moderator.
  • xungnguyenxungnguyen Member Posts: 171 Arc User
    edited July 23
    Are there any improvements I can make in my queen's log for Sapph?
    Post edited by xungnguyen on
    temporal_lapras__royal_flagship__by_lapry101-dbutq96.png


    "Revenge his foul and most unnatural murder." (King Hamlet Act 1 Scene 5)

    "Simba, you've forgotten me. You've forgotten who you are … you are my son and the one true king." (Mufasa)
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